Honour for service that grapples ‘warrior’ culture

Positive outlook: Wheatbelt Men’s Health team members Owen Catto, Terry Melrose and Tim Carew-Reid.
Positive outlook: Wheatbelt Men’s Health team members Owen Catto, Terry Melrose and Tim Carew-Reid.

Mr Catto said the initiative was important for men because of their ‘warrior mentality’.

‘This involves winning, risk-taking and a lack of communication,’ he said.

The successful initiative is a finalist in the Edith Cowan University Award for prevention, promotion and early intervention service or program category, as well as the University of WA School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience Award for excellence in rural and remote mental health.

Mr Catto said it was great to be recognised as a finalist.

‘After any event we get a number of calls, probably because we are not medical, not threatening and people feel comfortable,’ he said.

‘Two-thirds of the people who call are calling for someone else they are worried about.’

Mr Catto said although suicide rates across WA were relatively stable, they were higher in regional areas than in the city.

‘This has a lot to do with available services, most are just too far away,’ he said.

WA Mental Health Minister Helen Morton said the high calibre of entries in this year’s awards showed the commitment, passion and dedication displayed by West Australians who supported people with a mental illness, and those who loved and cared for them.

The award winners will be announced during Mental Health Week at the University of WA Club on October 8.

Winners will receive a $1000 prize and trophy designed by Disability in the Arts, Disadvantage in the Arts.