Award is music to care centre’s ears

Silke Steuxner and Margaret Van Zyl with Tibetan singing bowls. Picture: Jon Hewson www.communitypix.com.au d406470
Silke Steuxner and Margaret Van Zyl with Tibetan singing bowls. Picture: Jon Hewson www.communitypix.com.au d406470

They received a 2013 Better Practice Award for Innovation for their program using Tibetan bowl therapy to ease agitation amongst people with dementia.

‘The people behind these award-winning programs are industry leaders who are driving quality, driving improvement,’ accreditation agency chair Dr Andrew Refshauge said.

‘Their efforts are deserving of recognition.

‘Whether the program is about palliative care, art as therapy or staff development, the ultimate goal is improved quality of care for residents.’

A distinguished panel of aged care experts reviewed the applications and made 38 awards.

Brightwater The Cove began the Tibetan singing bowl sound therapy trial in March 2012 using a certified sound therapist.

The therapist provides regular weekly therapy using Tibetan singing bowls for small groups of residents. During the treatments, many of the residents appear calmer, happier, quieter and more relaxed.

This innovative type of program is part of Brightwater’s commitment to improving wellbeing in residents.

‘It is sometimes not easy for people living together, especially when troubled by dementia,’ chief executive of Brightwater care Penny Flett said.

‘The calming effect of the Tibetan singing bowls is remarkable, and helps each person to find happiness and pleasure.’

The Brightwater Centre, Brightwater Care Group’s research team, has carefully monitored the trial and the results from twice-weekly sessions have been exceptional. The results of the pilot study of 25 residents indicated that the level of aggression, both physical and verbal, had decreased by about 20 per cent during this time.