Mandurah’s new state-of-the-art garbage trucks roll out, keeping an eye on residents’ waste habits

Mayor Marina Vergone checks out one of the new trucks watched by James Dunn, Ralph Baker and Matthew Halliday.
Mayor Marina Vergone checks out one of the new trucks watched by James Dunn, Ralph Baker and Matthew Halliday.

WATCH out – Big Brother is watching you from a garbage truck.

Nine new Cleanaway state-of-the-art collection vehicles have hit the streets of Mandurah, featuring the latest technology, including six cameras each.

And at around $340,000 each, their operators are expected to treat them like Lamborghinis.

The camera system is integrated with the vehicle’s GPS tracking system, recording details about the collection route as well as the materials collected from household waste and recycling bins, to enable targeted sustainability education based on how residents are using their bins.

So no longer will anyone be able to sneak out an extra unpaid-for bin.

The vehicles also feature reversing sensors, onboard weighing systems and other technology to increase the safety and efficiency of the services.

The new vehicles also have significantly lower carbon emissions compared to the previous fleet.

The new side loaders (five for waste and two for recycling) each have the ability to service up to 1800 households a day.

The new Waste Alliance contract between the City of Mandurah and Cleanaway came into effect in September, continuing a 17-year alliance which employs about 40 local people.

Down the track, Cleanaway will run a competition to name the trucks.

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