A portrait of patience: Canning art exhibition

Artist Suzie Brown with some of her art that will feature in collaborative exhibition Diversity. Fellow artists Honor Lovis, Jan Robinson and Helen Kuyer will also be exhibiting work.
Artist Suzie Brown with some of her art that will feature in collaborative exhibition Diversity. Fellow artists Honor Lovis, Jan Robinson and Helen Kuyer will also be exhibiting work.

SUZIE Brown’s passion for portraiture lay dormant for many years.

Between her teen years sketching Charles Bronson’s striking face and 2008, life got in the way.

“One of the first things I remember drawing when I was a teenager was Charles Bronson,” she said.

“I loved his face, so I used to draw it and I was happy with what it looked like.”

With an artist for a mother, the former nurse from Canning Vale always erred to the creative side of things.

“I was a nurse for many years and I was in to crafts, but never thought I’d do proper art,” she said.

Seven years ago, and with her two kids in school leaving idle hands, she picked up a brush and began a course at the Canning Art Centre led by artist Robyn Lowry with three women who would become her close friends, and fellow exhibitors.

“With the other girls, we started doing a course at Canning Art Centre,” she said.

“Robyn Lowry pushed us out of our comfort zones, so after that course I did portraiture for about three years and then I started pushing it here and there and taking commissions.”

This Friday, Brown along with Honor Lovis, Jan Robinson and Helen Kuyer will open Diversity, a collaborative exhibit featuring a range of mediums including still life and sculpture.

Brown will exhibit about 13 pieces featuring the musicians who inspire her.

“The musicians are a journey through my past, whether they are strong women or legends,” she said.

“It’s about the integrity of the person, who stays true to their art form.

“Willy Nelson, although he’s not a shining example of morals… (in) his old gnarly hands you can see his commitment to his music, which is his first love.”

She said her interpretation has uniquely captured an impressionistic take on the various artists.

“I love to use big, bold colours, and big brush strokes,” she said.

“A stroke of paint can make someone look like who they are.

“Up close my work looks rough and that’s how I want it, I don’t want to paint super realism, sometimes it doesn’t get as much of an emotional response as an impressionistic (work).”