Helping cut diabetes risks

Biostatistician Matt Cooper’s research has helped to identify women who would benefit from follow-up care for diabetes in early adulthood. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au d412407
Biostatistician Matt Cooper’s research has helped to identify women who would benefit from follow-up care for diabetes in early adulthood. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au d412407

Biostatistician Matt Cooper presented his team’s research, which aimed to help pinpoint women who would benefit from closer follow-up care, at the World Diabetes Congress in Melbourne.

Mr Cooper led the team of researchers from the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, UWA’s Centre for Child Health Research and Princess Margaret Hospital for Children.

‘Our study found that females with childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes have a higher mortality rate before the age of 40 that is 11 times higher than the general population,’ he said.

‘Identifying sub-groups of patients at higher risk means we can change our clinical planning and keep an eye on women who have increased risks of having issues.’

Mr Cooper said poor control of blood sugar levels, low socio-economic status and four or more episodes of dangerously low blood glucose levels during childhood were key risk factors.