Birds being killed with kindness

L-R: Max Box of Bassendean (Natural Areas Team Leader) and Janelle de Silva of Kenwick (Natural Areas Attendant).  People are feeding ducks at Mitchell Park in Bentley and it's bad for the animals and environment.
L-R: Max Box of Bassendean (Natural Areas Team Leader) and Janelle de Silva of Kenwick (Natural Areas Attendant). People are feeding ducks at Mitchell Park in Bentley and it's bad for the animals and environment.

Canning acting chief executive Steve Atwell said it was important for the community to understand the dangers of feeding birds.

‘While feeding waterbirds is often done with good intentions, the practice of feeding birds is not healthy for the birds or the environment,’ Mr Atwell said.

Feeding birds leads to a build-up of nutrients in the water, allowing bacteria to grow to levels that are toxic to birds.

Last year’s outbreak was the paralytic disease avian botulism.

It can lead to weakness, paralysis and death in birds, although it is not dangerous to humans.

Mr Atwell said birds affected by the toxic bacteria could be saved if treated immediately.

‘City of Canning officers have saved five birds in the last 12 months,’ Mr Atwell said. ‘We encourage people to call the City if they find a paralysed bird in Mitchell Park so staff can take the animal immediately to be treated.’

The City believes the last outbreak was caused by too much bread and rice in the lake.

The City will start a revegetation program over winter to help improve the water quality of the lake.

Call 9231 0606 if you find a sick or injured bird in the City of Canning.