City’s hands tied on roo

The western grey kangaroo stranded in Willetton was moved to Darling Range Wildlife Shelter for treatment.
The western grey kangaroo stranded in Willetton was moved to Darling Range Wildlife Shelter for treatment.

Instead, the kangaroo remained on a vacant lot on Elgon Hill for 2½ days before WA Department of Parks and Wildlife (DPaW) officers tended to it.

The western grey was eventually tranquilised, taken to the vet for observation and relocated to the Darling Range Wildlife Shelter, where it is still recovering.

This was after residents made more than 30 calls for help, including to the City.

Canning chief executive Lyn Russell said under the Local Government Act, City officers were not authorised to deal with native animals.

‘City officers do try to protect native animals from dangers such as traffic when they occasionally appear in residential areas, however, local government staff are not authorised to attempt to capture native animals,’ Ms Russell said.

‘In this case, the kangaroo had left the area and staff could not provide any further assistance.

‘The officer did provide the resident with the contact details of Wildcare and explained the City of Canning is not authorised to deal with native animals.’

Ms Russell said council called Wildcare to report the kangaroo after receiving notification from the resident.

A DPaW spokesperson said kangaroos usually made their own way home and tranquilising them could be stressful, or fatal, to them.

Residents should call Wildcare on 9474 9055 if they see a displaced kangaroo.