Exercise, diet our best pals

Professor Sebely Pal had to take responsibility for her own body after having three children. She has devoted her professional life to helping people understand the mechanics behind weight loss and healthy living. Picture: Matthew Poon www.communitypix.com.au d400205
Professor Sebely Pal had to take responsibility for her own body after having three children. She has devoted her professional life to helping people understand the mechanics behind weight loss and healthy living. Picture: Matthew Poon www.communitypix.com.au d400205

With the increasing availability of junk food and fast food outlets at our fingertips, Professor Pal says it’s not hard to see why 60 per cent of Australians are battling obesity.

Prof Pal has been a health and obesity researcher for the past 10 years at Curtin and is dedicated to unlock easy and understandable health tips for people to follow.

The researcher spoke with the Canning Times about her own battle with obesity and how curiosity into her own body led to a career helping others.

Prof Pal has conducted many clinical trials, including those surrounding fitness routines and eating behaviours.

The aim of her research has been to compare the efficiency of two different fitness or eating programs and to find the simplest ways for people to understand the mechanics behind weight loss and healthy living.

‘I know what it’s like to battle obesity. Before I had my three children I was at my biggest weight but I decided to take responsibility for my own body,’ Prof Pal said

‘All of the research I have done has led me to believe people are just unsure of what it really means to just find 30 minutes of exercise every day and what it means to have a healthy diet.

‘I have conducted many clinical trials relating to weight-loss participants using pedometers to record 10,000 steps a day, and alternating breakfast choices. The combination of resistance and aerobic diets are what works.

‘The problem with diet shakes and fat pills is that people see ‘clinically tested’ on the bottle and assume it must be good for you but a lot of them are not tested scientifically, so it’s a big money-making business.

Prof Pal said the amount of fat supplements on the market is a concern and gives people a false indication that losing weight can happen overnight, rather than being open to a lifestyle change.

You can read more about Prof Pal’s research at http://oasisapps.curtin.edu.au.