Atwell woman’s work recognised with John Curtin Medal award


Angela Ryder, senior manager for Aboriginal Sevices with Relationships Australia. Picture: Martin Kennealey www.communitypix.com.au  d474927
Angela Ryder, senior manager for Aboriginal Sevices with Relationships Australia. Picture: Martin Kennealey www.communitypix.com.au d474927

REMOVED from her family and placed in missions at eight years old, Angela Ryder grew up determined to help others from the Stolen Generation.

Originally from Katanning, the Atwell resident spent four years at Wandering and Roelands missions.

Despite not completing Year 10 studies, Mrs Ryder succeeded at university – she graduated from Curtin University in 1998 with a Bachelor of Commerce in Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations.

This year she has received a John Curtin Medal from the university for her work in establishing positive initiatives and programs to build independence in Aboriginal people.

Mrs Ryder said making the world a better place for her family and all Aboriginal people is what drives her.

Curtin University Vice-Chancellor Professor Deborah Terry said Mrs Ryder’s story was undoubtedly inspiring.

“As someone who experiences the lasting and full impact of the Stolen Generation on her life, and through her professional experience, Angela recognised grief and suffering as major issues within sections of the Aboriginal community,” she said.

“Angela has established positive initiatives to build independence in Aboriginal people and empower Aboriginal women through her role for the past 10 years as Senior Manager of Aboriginal Services at Relationships Australia WA and through her volunteer roles.”

Mrs Ryder also developed the Moorditj Yoka Women’s Group, spent 15 years as the inaugural chair of the Langford Aboriginal Association and been involved in the delivery of NAIDOC celebrations in Perth and Gosnells.

MORE: ‘Lucky’ Melville man to go on ride for lymphoma awareness

MORE: Hamilton Hill: former aerial skier develops AT Chat to help people living with disabilities access information

MORE: New research shows haggling on home loan can save homebuyers significantly