Cockburn council approves City’s Youth Services Strategy

A new pump track in Hamilton Hill was example of one youth project completed in the City in 2017. Luke Snelling, Mike Lee, Callan Stibbards and Jake Corless are pictured atop it. Photo: Conor McGrath/City of Cockburn
A new pump track in Hamilton Hill was example of one youth project completed in the City in 2017. Luke Snelling, Mike Lee, Callan Stibbards and Jake Corless are pictured atop it. Photo: Conor McGrath/City of Cockburn

YOUNG people living in the City of Cockburn could reap the benefits of about $88,000 worth of funding after the council adopted the City’s Youth Services Strategy 2017-22 last week.

The strategy forms part of the City’s ongoing commitment to work with young people to help them reach their potential by providing quality events, programs and facilities, according to Community development manager Gail Bowman.

“Some new initiatives that may receive funding include exploring possible use of the Henderson motorcycle facility for trail bike use, upgrading acoustics at the youth centre hall to enable events that require sound such as film screenings, and development of library services specifically for youth aged 10-24,” she said.

As part of the strategy, the City’s Youth Services team spoke to 316 young people, 36 parents and caregivers, representatives from 30 organisations and 53 City staff members.

Areas identified for development included providing transport to local events, building better relationships with local schools, implementation of the Cockburn Regional Youth Driver Education (RYDE) program, an interactive online forum and continuing the council’s in-house Aboriginal Employment Strategy.

A review of the 2011 youth strategy identified some gaps in youth services and facilities including hosting separate counsellors for drug and alcohol, sexual health and financial issues, plus establishment of a support or social group for local LGBTIQ youth at the Cockburn centre.

During the Strategy’s preparation, young people said their main concerns were the cost of things and a lack of money to do the things they wanted to do, boredom and a lack of things to do, transport and difficulty getting around, drugs and alcohol, not knowing what services were available, feeling unsafe in certain places and situations, employment, and feeling valued as a part of the community.

The City’s previous Strategy had several successes including expanding youth development and outreach services, recreation facilities and partnerships, and a stronger connection with the Youth Advisory Committee.

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