Roe 8 rememdiation works set to start, temporary fencing to be removed


Tim Barling (Conservation Council of WA vice president and City of Melville councillor), Community Wildlife Corridor co-convenor Kim Dravnieks, City of Cockburn parks and environment manager Anton Lees, Bicton MLA and Rehabilitating Roe 8 Working Group chair Lisa O’Malley, North Lake resident Joe Branco and Community Wildlife Corridor co-convenor Felicity Bairstow in Bibra Lake this afternoon, where contractors were removing temporary fencing.
Tim Barling (Conservation Council of WA vice president and City of Melville councillor), Community Wildlife Corridor co-convenor Kim Dravnieks, City of Cockburn parks and environment manager Anton Lees, Bicton MLA and Rehabilitating Roe 8 Working Group chair Lisa O’Malley, North Lake resident Joe Branco and Community Wildlife Corridor co-convenor Felicity Bairstow in Bibra Lake this afternoon, where contractors were removing temporary fencing.

TEMPORARY fencing used to cordon off a Roe 8 work site will be packed away, with initial remediation work also due to start.

Contractors began removing fencing on the corner of Hope Road and Progress Drive this afternoon, while mulch piles are set to be relocated to a temporary holding site, asbestos will be removed and weed management will be put in place.

Rehabilitating Roe 8 Working Group chair, Bicton MLA Lisa O’Malley, said the aim is to make the area safe before a decision is made on the long-term management of the area.

Regrowth will be monitored this year, with revegetation planting likely to start in 2018.

“The amount of work that’s gone into getting to this point is only possible given we’ve had the community and government come together on the project,” Ms O’Malley said.

“What you’re seeing here is the result of that work and that’s been going on behind the scenes since we were elected.

“So although the community hasn’t seen anything happening, it’s because of the huge amount of work that had to go on to get to this stage.

“It’s a proud moment to see this section re-opened and the possibility of what’s going to happen over the next few weeks and months.

“To rehabilitate 42ha is a huge undertaking and what we’re seeing here is just the beginning.”

The working group, which includes representatives from the State Government, local MPs, City of Cockburn and Aboriginal custodians, meet weekly to discuss how best to approach the rehabilitation.

Community Wildlife Corridor co-convenor Kim Dravnieks said a scope of works was being put together as the basis for the ten-year management plan.

“Hopefully (the community) understands even though it’s been ten weeks since the election and they haven’t seen anything happen, now the huge amount of work we’ve done negotiating is coming to fruition,” she said.

MORE: Work begins on new WA museum 

MORE: Pizza delivery driver suffers dreadful injuries in hit and run

MORE: Mandurah man takes novel approach to finding work