Award lets Liam see there are no limits in life

Liam Good is involved in remote controlled car racing, wheelchair rugby, hockey and soccer, among other things. d409671
Liam Good is involved in remote controlled car racing, wheelchair rugby, hockey and soccer, among other things. d409671

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award for WA is a pilot program to encourage young people between the ages of 15 and 25 to develop personal skills and get involved in the community.

Liam (16) has muscular dystrophy and said he was not involved in many activities before the award and learnt there is more out there for him.

‘I’m trying to get enjoyment out of something, I got a bit bored of doing nothing,’ he said.

‘There is much more out there I can do than I thought.’

Liam said if his mother Sharon Good had not encouraged him to do the award he would not have participated.

Mrs Good said the award has given Liam something to look forward to and make his own.

‘So many people with disabilities don’t get out, and the award has shown him that there aren’t any limits,’ she said.

The award is individual to participants, with emphasis placed on them to create their own award journey that will challenge and push them outside of their comfort zones.

The four categories of the award are skill, physical recreation, volunteering and adventurous journey, which must be completed by June.

Liam said he was involved in remote controlled car racing, wheelchair rugby, hockey and soccer, and is on a skate park committee.

Muscular Dystrophy Western Australia received funding from The Channel 7 Telethon Trust to support six young people with muscular dystrophy in their completion of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award.