Bowling green: Gosnells club lowers carbon footprint with new LED lights

Thornlie MLA Chris Tallentire (foreground) with (Background, L-R) Gosnells Bowling Club President Peter Charkiewicz, Annette Sheridan, Penny Wright, Merle Burn and Vice President Rob Gibbons. Photo: Jon Hewson
Thornlie MLA Chris Tallentire (foreground) with (Background, L-R) Gosnells Bowling Club President Peter Charkiewicz, Annette Sheridan, Penny Wright, Merle Burn and Vice President Rob Gibbons. Photo: Jon Hewson

THE Gosnells Bowling Club’s new LED lights are just the latest instalment in a club-wide effort to become more eco-friendly.

The club has officially unveiled the LED lights, which will allow it to increase the number of night games on offer.

However, President Peter Charkiewicz said the new lights were also part of the club’s push to become more environmentally conscious.

“We changed all lights to LED, because we’re doing a little bit to reduce emissions,” he said.

“Running costs will be significantly decreased, our carbon footprint reduces and we’re seen to be more responsible and eco-friendly.

“We commenced this thinking about three years ago when we replaced all internal lights, started looking at waste management and thought about how we could try and reduce waste and use biodegradable materials.”

Mr Charkiewicz said the new lights allowed the club to offer three greens for night games for their 400 members.

“There will be more effective spread of light, more a daylight effect than the old lights, which gave off a yellow type of light,” he said.

“The new ones are more white, more natural, which will make it a lot easier under light.”

The lights were built following a $100,000 grant from the Local Projects Local Jobs program.

The grant was presented by Thornlie MLA Chris Tallentire.

The club will use some of the remaining grant money to replace old seats with new brick and aluminium seating.

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