Cancer’s close call

Andrew Hind was training and fighting as a boxer before he was diagnosed with testicular cancer. d396209
Andrew Hind was training and fighting as a boxer before he was diagnosed with testicular cancer. d396209

He recalls the date with absolute clarity.

It was July 12, 2011. A day which he would normally have used to celebrate his family’s Scottish heritage.

That day, instead of celebrating he was sitting in his doctor’s office with a knee injury when he asked the GP to look at a lump in his groin.

‘I’d let it go for probably three or four months before I did anything,’ Mr Hind said.

‘I told the GP I’d found a lump. He immediately sent me next door for an ultrasound and the ultrasound technician basically broke the news.’

He stayed in hospital for a series of tests, had the cancer and testicle removed, and after his recovery from surgery he was given one big dose of chemotherapy.

‘The smell of food made me feel really sick, I lost quite a bit of weight through the chemo, stress and surgery.

‘Financially it was hard as well. I couldn’t work for three to four months.’

Before his treatment, Mr Hind had sperm stored in case of fertility problems.

He still finds it hard to sleep, experiences cold sweats and hot flushes and is required to have regular scans and blood tests.

‘I’ve never felt the same since the chemotherapy,’ he said.

But Mr Hind feels he has overcome cancer, and was well supported by friend Robert Moscio who has his own battle with a rare cancer.

Mr Hind was training and fighting as a boxer before the diagnosis but the cancer experience led him to take on a new role as a professional boxing judge.

Cancer reshaped his outlook on life.

‘I don’t let things upset me that much any more, you could be dead tomorrow,’ he said.

‘I want to live life to the fullest. Family, health and lifestyle are important.’

Mr Hind, who has a five-year-old son, is back at work as a plasterer, but urged other young men not to ignore any suspicious lumps they may find on their bodies.

‘I was a little apprehensive about my doctor looking at it because of the area it’s in but they’ve seen a lot worse than that before.

‘If you have any doubts, go and get it checked straight away.’