City of Armadale to plant 1500 more trees to combat urban heat

City of Armadale deputy mayor Ruth Butterfield was comfortably returned in River ward with 78.52 per cent of votes.
City of Armadale deputy mayor Ruth Butterfield was comfortably returned in River ward with 78.52 per cent of votes.

KELMSCOTT streets are being given a “tree-lift” with 1500 trees set to be planted by City of Armadale parks and garden staff.

The tree planting program is aimed at protecting and improving parks, reserves and streetscapes as part of the city’s urban forest strategy.

Armadale Mayor Henry Zelones said the city was trying to develop streetscapes and parks that include attractive, healthy and appropriate trees for the benefit of the entire community.

“Trees provide a connection with nature, a sense of local character, reduce heat-related stress and can act as traffic and stormwater control devices,” he said.

“In past decades, tree populations in many Australian cities have declined, particularly with the loss of private open spaces like backyards.”

A total of 915 trees were planted last year, which was 585 trees sort of the target for the first year of the program.

“However these will be planted during this year’s program,” he said.

“This will see an additional 1500 trees planted in all residential streets bounded by Champion Drive, Westfield Road and Railway Avenue in Kelmscott,” Cr Zelones said.

“As these street trees require nurturing and watering throughout the year, it is hoped that residents will assist us to ensure the trees flourish.”

Cr Zones said the city was confident that the trees would provide a canopy cover to help reduce the city’s “heat island”.

This would help maximise health and wellbeing benefits for the community.

The city was one of the first councils in WA to develop and adopt an urban forest strategy.