Kaarakin black cockatoo centre offers public chance to name, save birds


Volunteer Karen Wyatt and P&N bank manager Joy Evans check on the health of the birds. Picture: Jon Hewson  d471894
Volunteer Karen Wyatt and P&N bank manager Joy Evans check on the health of the birds. Picture: Jon Hewson d471894

THE early bird truly gets the worm at Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre, which is giving the public the chance to name its cockatoos – and also help save the lives of the birds.

For $1000, people can name the sanctuary’s rehabilitating birds. The money will help pay for the birds’ medical treatment and the centre’s expenses.

Donors will also have the opportunity to attend the cockatoo’s release when it is healthy enough to be set free.

Kaarakin volunteer Karen Wyatt said the not-for-profit centre always needed money, which was why they were frequently looking for new fundraising ventures.

“We do fantastic work for these poor birds,” she said.

“We’re the only ones in the state who do it in terms of rescuing and rehabilitating. If we don’t do it, they’re going to be extinct.”

Ms Wyatt said their work was even more important given the current plight of the black cockatoo, with all three WA species under the threat of extinction due to construction and expansion.

As part of Kaarakin’s program, P&N Bank manager Joy Evans donated money to help fund the recovery process of Lily, a new addition to the centre.

Ms Wyatt said: “Kaarakin is very, very grateful for P&N Bank and as you can see, we’ve put it to good use,” she said.