Making time for orphans

Members of the Challis Early Childhood Education Centre team in India.
Members of the Challis Early Childhood Education Centre team in India.

The group set off for India with Equal Health, an Australian volunteer charity organisation that improves the sight, dental care and health of some of the world’s most vulnerable people by calling on medical professionals to donate their time.

This is the first time an extra team of teachers have joined Equal Health.

They are staying at an orphanage, teaching English to disadvantaged children and providing them with close to $4000 worth of educational resources.

CECE deputy principal Louise O’Donovan said she heard about Equal Health through the organisation’s vice- chairwoman Kristy Tomlinson, who supervised Curtin University’s health science students at CECE.

‘Kristy said ‘I can’t see why teachers can’t go as well’ and that was the catalyst for getting the wheels in motion for our Challis trip to India,’ Ms O’Donovan said.

‘It is quite overwhelming when you think about what needs to be done and how much you can actually contribute.

‘However, if we can provide the children with our love and attention, teach them a little English, play with them, pamper them and give them some respite from their daily grind, that would be fantastic.’

Equal Health founder and Perth optical dispenser Paul Clarke, who will make his 18th trip to India with the charity next month, said the Equal Health program makes a vast improvement to the lives of people in isolated areas.

‘If we can provide them with health care it helps them to get on with the next stage of their life,’ he said.