Microchipping reunites missing dog and owner in Gosnells

Angie, a kelpie from the Animal Protection Society of WA, poses for a picture.
Angie, a kelpie from the Animal Protection Society of WA, poses for a picture.

THE City of Gosnells is encouraging residents to microchip their dogs following the new laws to have dogs microchipped by December 1.

Currently, more than 75 per cent of dogs in the City are microchipped, which compares to less than half a year ago.

As of November 1 this year, it became compulsory for all dogs to be microchipped that have reached three months of age regardless of registration status.

The reason it is being encouraged is that it makes it easier to reunite dogs with their owners if a dog runs away or goes missing.

City of Gosnells resident Kellie Lyon is one such person. Thanks to microchipping, she and her dog, Buddha, were reunited after her pet had been missing for six months.

Buddha was found in Kalamunda and had its microchip scanned which allowed rangers to identify which family she belonged to.

Ms Lyon said she was not expecting the call, having assumed the family Rottweiler had been stolen from her property.

She had contacted local pounds and posted about her missing dog on Facebook.

“The kids are so excited to have Buddha back home and I could not be happier,” Ms Lyon said.

“We were certain we’d never see her again so the phone call from the pound came out of the blue.”