Stress, suffering for snakes in fruit nets

Volunteer Hamish Burnett with the injured dugite. Picture: Marcelo Palacios d413599
Volunteer Hamish Burnett with the injured dugite. Picture: Marcelo Palacios d413599

The snake, which had been deliberately trapped in the netting, was rescued by centre volunteers, but had suffered a few cuts and stress, prompting centre supervisor Kristy Gaikhorst to strongly advise against the practice.

‘If a snake gets caught in the netting out in the sun, it will overheat and die.

‘It’s also very stressful for the snake, as the netting causes constrictions in their body, which often results in serious injuries, including cuts and sweating, and death,’ she said.

Volunteer Hamish Burnett, who rescued the snake, said although dugites were a venomous and potentially lethal snake, they are also shy and will quickly disappear if they see a human.

‘There’s such a misunderstanding about them. They’re not aggressive at all,’ he said.

The rescued snake is expected to make a full recovery and be released back into the wild.

Armadale Reptile and Wildlife Centre removes snakes from people’s backyards if they request them to do so.

Ms Gaikhorst also said if people come across sick, injured or orphaned wildlife they can contact the Wildcare Helpline on 9474 9055.