The healing process

SKHKAC deputy chairwoman Dezerae Miller with project officer Alta Winmar.|Picture: Marcelo Palacios www.communitypix.com.au d422172
SKHKAC deputy chairwoman Dezerae Miller with project officer Alta Winmar.|Picture: Marcelo Palacios www.communitypix.com.au d422172

Managing director of SKHKAC Tjalaminu Mia said the DVD Walking Country, which SKHKAC and Commincare Communities for Children created in collaboration with the Boodjari Yorgas Family Care Program, gives a picture of strength to new mothers and their children through the Nyungar culture.

The Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY), also launched at the cultural event, is a two-year home based parenting and early childhood learning program, which empowers Aboriginal parents and carers to be their child’s first teacher.

Ms Mia said the program reinforces the need for education, while helping parents prepare their four and five-year-old children for school.

‘It’s a prime opportunity for our children to have further education before they move into mainstream schooling. SKHKAC have also developed a cultural healing program to fit with the education program, which will teach language, cultural identity, pride, dance, singing and nutrition.’

Twenty-five Aboriginal families in Armadale and 25 Aboriginal families in Gosnells will initially be engaged in the program, which has been well supported by elders in the community.

Communicare chief executive Martine Pitts said they will deliver the HIPPY program in Armadale and Gosnells in partnership with SKHKAC.