Canning Districts athletics training buddies have each other primed ahead of Sydney championships

Canning athletes Terry Price and Wesley Salisbury will represent WA at the National Athletics Championships.
Canning athletes Terry Price and Wesley Salisbury will represent WA at the National Athletics Championships.

CANNING Districts athletes and training partners Terry Price and Wesley Salisbury are looking to make a splash at the 2017 Australian Athletics Championships in Sydney from March 26 to April 2.

Price and Salisbury, the only two Canning men to qualify for the national championships, are confident of making an impact in Sydney.

Price, a T/F20 400 and 200-metre sprinter, is making his seventh appearance at nationals.

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He said the pair had been keeping each other honest and pushing one another at training to strengthen their preparation.

“We keep each other after training, ask each other, ‘did you hit your time at training’, ‘did you not’, ‘why didn’t you hit it.’

“We’re asking each other questions, we’re having a few catch-ups during the week, and that puts us where we should be and keeps us accountable for our training.”

Price, who recorded a couple of personal bests in the lead-up to nationals, said he was hoping for a podium finish in the 200.

Salisbury will contest the decathlon for the fourth straight year and was targeting a personal best plus a top ten finish.

He said nationals were a perfect building block towards his long-term goal of representing his country.

“To earn that Australian uniform is probably the highest goal I’m chasing at the moment.

“But also, to continually improve, it takes a little while longer for decathletes to mature, just because there are so many events.

“The (theory of) ten thousand hours to master something, ten thousand hours times ten events means it takes a little while longer to get it together.”