Hearing loss probe

Masters student Anita Tran tests Trevor Franklin's hearing in a sound proof booth.
Masters student Anita Tran tests Trevor Franklin's hearing in a sound proof booth.

Ms Tran, a master of audiology student at the University of WA, said she hoped to find out more about the workers’ experiences post-compensation, particularly in relation to any hearing rehabilitation they may have received.

‘Noise-induced hearing loss or ‘industrial deafness’ is one of the most common occupational health hazards caused by excessive exposure to noise over a period of time,’ she said.

‘Unlike most occupational injuries, noise damage is invisible and permanent, and the signs of hearing loss are often not noticed until it is too late.

‘Workers who have been significantly impaired by noise damage may be eligible to receive compensation for noise-induced hearing loss.’

If you have worked in high-level workplace noise and received compensation for noise induced hearing loss, Anita would be happy to hear from you and can be contacted by email at trana03@student.uwa.edu.au or 0466 678 979.