WASO’s Michael Waye relishes taking on Indiana Jones score


Ellie Lawrence (Guildford) and Michael Waye (West Leederville) in the A History of the World in 100 Objects exhibition at WA Museum. Picure: Andrew Ritchie d454588
Ellie Lawrence (Guildford) and Michael Waye (West Leederville) in the A History of the World in 100 Objects exhibition at WA Museum. Picure: Andrew Ritchie d454588

HARRISON Ford has been a hero to WASO flute and piccolo player Michael Waye since the actor’s film career began.

So it has been a sentimental journey down memory lane for Waye as he revisits Ford’s film, Raiders of the Lost Ark, which will screen June 15 and 16 with the music score performed live by WASO.

“I grew up along the northern beaches of Sydney and was studying at Canberra School of Music when the film came out in 1981,” Waye said.

“It’s been nice to relive these larger than life figures; the dramatic storyline, and the fantasy element with adventure is what I really like.

“It appeals to the travel bug I have; a lot of them (Indiana Jones films) are set in exotic destinations like the Middle East and Egypt, which are places I have aspired to go and have been to.

“I’ve visited some of those Egyptian temples; one of them I’ve actually played at.”

Waye, who joined WASO in 1987 and lectures at UWA, said creating John Williams’ soundscape for the film was challenging and involved more musicians than many people would think.

“When you look at the stage there are about 120 to 130 people sitting on there with their instruments,” he said.

“It’s exciting for the audience to see that process happening live while the film is being shown. It’s also interesting for us to see how it all slots together.

“The piccolo is the smallest and loudest instrument in the orchestra and it’s used a lot in the Raiders score during all the car chases and fight scenes; anytime there’s anything dramatic, there’s usually a piccolo or flute floating around.”

Waye said the concerts were part of a global trend of symphony orchestras playing to film screenings, which were a great way of taking audiences behind the scenes of the film soundtrack.

“Watching a film without sound doesn’t have the same impact at all,” he said.

“Indiana Jones is a strong part of my cultural history and background.

“It appeals to the sense of the fantastic; I’m a bit of a daydreamer.”

THE ESSENTIALS

What: Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark live in concert with WASO

Where: Riverside Theatre

When: June 15 and 16

Tickets: www.ticketek.com.au