AARLI label owner receives design scholarship to help grow brand


Teagan Cowlishaw is the brains behind the brand AARLI. She became the 2016 recipient of the Creative Enterprise Australia Indigenous Fashion Accelerator at Queensland University of Technology. Picture: Andrew Ritchie
Teagan Cowlishaw is the brains behind the brand AARLI. She became the 2016 recipient of the Creative Enterprise Australia Indigenous Fashion Accelerator at Queensland University of Technology. Picture: Andrew Ritchie

AFTER three years of applying, northern suburbs creative Teagan Cowlishaw has become the 2016 recipient of a Creative Enterprise Australia Indigenous Fashion Accelerator scholarship.

The AARLI label small business owner who uses recycled products in her designs, became the first WA recipient of the scholarship, which is run by the Queensland University of Technology.

Cowlishaw said since receiving the scholarship in April she had been developing new samples and working on the label’s spring-summer 2016-17 which included 13 garments to make eight complete looks and two accessories.

“This collection and accessories have been produced from recycled plastic bottle fabric, leftover end of roll textiles, organic fabrics and car upholstery,” she said.

“The program has allowed my brand to develop to the next level from being able to work with an amazing production team to produce our next range of samples.

“They’ve helped to develop our business on how to start applying sustainable business models and planning for upgrading business structure.

“We’ve also spent time developing marketing material and content for our upcoming website.”

As well as the collection due for presale on October 1, which will include a sport cap and sports bag made from recycled plastic bottle fabric, Cowlishaw said she had also collaborated with Indigenous street brand “Haus of Dizzy”.

The collaboration will see part proceeds from each product sold go into an Indigenous community initiative that will implement creative industries training programs into remote WA communities for disadvantage Indigenous youths.

Adding another feather to her cap, Cowlishaw said she was also recently approached by Australian Indigenous Mentor Experience to come on board as an ambassador next year, which she hoped could lead to a possible collaboration with brands Seafolly, Havianas and OneTeaspoon.