Beechboro Christian School wins WA Little Scientists Early STEM Award in Science Week

Beechboro Christian School Pre-primary students with educator Ashley Fuller, principal Justin Krause, East Metropolitan MLC Donna Faragher, parent committee chairman David Streeton, AISWA curriculum consultant Glenda Leslie, head of primary Michael Bolan, and Rebecca McKeen from Little Scientists Australia. Picture: Little Scientists Australia
Beechboro Christian School Pre-primary students with educator Ashley Fuller, principal Justin Krause, East Metropolitan MLC Donna Faragher, parent committee chairman David Streeton, AISWA curriculum consultant Glenda Leslie, head of primary Michael Bolan, and Rebecca McKeen from Little Scientists Australia. Picture: Little Scientists Australia

BEECHBORO Christian School is the State winner of the 2018 Little Scientists Early STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) Award.

The award celebrates early childhood educators’ commitment to inquiry-based learning in STEM education, providing opportunities for children to learn as they explore, discover, create, improvise, test theories and imagine.

Little Scientists Australia director Sibylle Seidler presented the Bennett Springs school with the award during National Science Week, recognising its work to integrate STEM experiences in everyday learning.

“We want all of Australia’s children to grow into resilient individuals capable of critical thinking and problem solving through inquiry-based learning and playful scientific exploration,” she said.

The school’s project ‘The wonders of water’ began with the question, ‘what is water?’ and children went on to investigate the states of water and bringing in the rainbows and sunlight.

The project captured the children’s ideas and incorporated inquiry-based learning and STEM activities in the sports program and swimming.

Teacher Hazel Grove was involved in the activity and said STEM learning experiences provided children with opportunities to make sense of the world.

“The children were sophisticated in their thinking yet also full of wonder,” she said.

“Working with the pre-primary children as they discovered the properties of water through inquiry allowed me to understand and observe their scientific thoughts and ideas.

“The hands-on approach in the project encouraged the children to engage in sensory experiences.”