Cross-cultural care

Clinical midwife Linda Viljoen with Balga resident Jenny Par Cin Zoh who is originally from Burma and is 28 weeks pregnant. Picture: Marcus Whisson www.communitypix.com.au d416899
Clinical midwife Linda Viljoen with Balga resident Jenny Par Cin Zoh who is originally from Burma and is 28 weeks pregnant. Picture: Marcus Whisson www.communitypix.com.au d416899

A specialist service OPH provides patients is its antenatal care for mothers-to-be attending clinics and workshops for support.

Balga mother-to-be Jenny Par Cin Zoh, who moved to Australia six years ago from Burma and is 28 weeks pregnant with her first child, uses the antenatal services and translator provided by the hospital.

Clinical nurse manager in women’s and newborn services Donna Baker said striving for continuous improvement in the relationship between staff and people from diverse backgrounds was important to deliver better health outcomes.

‘The WA Health Department has a Women’s and Newborns Health Network and Refugee and Migrant Women’s Working Group that recently held a workshop at OPH to focus on this issue,’ she said.

‘The workshop’s aim was to highlight the cultural differences and sensitivities of women and families from diverse backgrounds to enhance the experience and outcomes for patients and staff across the maternal journey.

‘It was a great opportunity to discuss issues specifically found at our site and to strengthen partnerships with local supporting agencies and non-government organisations.

‘While the focus was on maternal care for refugee and migrant women and families, the findings have broader implications across all areas of the hospital.’