Fight for Bayswater’s heritage

Paul Davidson, Niall O'Flaherty, Caroline Morgan, Paul Dolden, Keith Clements, Ruth Kelly and City of Bayswater Council candidate Dan Bull are concerned about the King Street development.  Picture: David Baylis        www.communitypix.com.au   d443574
Fight for Bayswater’s heritage
Paul Davidson, Niall O'Flaherty, Caroline Morgan, Paul Dolden, Keith Clements, Ruth Kelly and City of Bayswater Council candidate Dan Bull are concerned about the King Street development. Picture: David Baylis        www.communitypix.com.au d443574

RESIDENTS are fighting the demolition of historical buildings in Bayswater and believe proposed modern developments will ruin the city’s heritage.

The proposal submitted to the council for 9 and 11 King William Street includes a seven-storey (facing King William Street) and six-storey building (facing the right of way) development, comprising 27 multiple dwellings, two offices with a total floor area of 197sqm and associated parking.

The council approved the demolition of the building at number 9, while any redevelopment of number 11 should include retaining the front facade of the building.

Resident Keith Clements said both existing buildings, each built in the early 1900s, needed to be retained because they were of historical significance and that enough of the city’s past had been knocked down.

“I am not against development and being a resident in Bayswater for 20 years, I have been waiting all this time for a suitable change in our village,” he said.

“The proposed development is a collection of modern concrete blocks and would ruin the feel and atmosphere of the existing streetscape.

“If this proposed development goes ahead in its present form we will be allowing a precedent that will turn Bayswater’s main street into something that is not relevant to a turn-of-the-century village and more of a copy of something that could be found in Ellenbrook or Joondalup.”

Mayor Sylvan Albert said number 9 had some importance, but was not considered to be essential to the development of the locality.

“The building has been substantially modified over time with moderate (compromised) authenticity whereby its original heritage values have been reduced,” he said.

“Furthermore, the subject building is not considered a true representation of traditional type development within the Bayswater town centre, unlike other existing buildings along King William Street, such as the buildings at 4, 6, 8, 13 and 15.

“In terms of 11 King William Street, the building has high integrity and authenticity, and it is considered that the place has heritage significance.

“It is considered the building positively contributes to the place albeit behind the façade it has been substantially modified.”

Cr Albert said the development proposal would be assessed in terms of the vision, objective and development requirements relating to the site and having regard to the submissions received during the public comment period.

The council will discuss the proposal at its October 13 meeting, with the application to be determined by the Metropolitan Central Joint Development Assessment Panel at a later meeting.