Hampton Park PS creates giant Rainbow Serpent mural using recycled coffee pods


Year 4 teacher Glynis Cardy, principal Phil Springett, Brian Nokes and Geogia Griffiths (Year 4) with the large Rainbow Serpent mural, made using recycled coffee pods. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d469742
Year 4 teacher Glynis Cardy, principal Phil Springett, Brian Nokes and Geogia Griffiths (Year 4) with the large Rainbow Serpent mural, made using recycled coffee pods. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d469742

HAMPTON Park Primary School has drawn inspiration from Aboriginal art in creating a mural with recycled coffee pods as part of a recycling project.

The school was awarded a Department of Aboriginal Affairs’ PALS Project grant to build the aluminium frame in the shape of a Rainbow Serpent.

Year 3 teacher Glynis Cardy said the serpent mural was 2.7m in height and 5m wide and featured a dot pattern, which was popular in Aboriginal art.

“The Rainbow Serpent has a significant meaning in Aboriginal Dreamtime stories and this art project provided an opportunity for all the children at Hampton Park to hear about the story,” she said.

“Every class was given 200 Nespresso pods to create a design for their part of the serpent which has created the amazing unique design.

“Each teacher read or told the story of the Rainbow Serpent to their class to give the project meaning and to help the children understand the significance it has for Aboriginal people.”

Ms Cardy said the mural complemented the school’s 10-year-old vegetable garden.

“We have two fridge worm farms and the coffee grinds from the pods were used for the worms and in our compost tumblers,” she said.

“We saved thousands of pods from going to landfill because the school community, family and friends helped collect them.”

She said recycling had been a strong focus for the school as classes often collected recyclable and reusable items.

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