Sprays Could Be Killing Our Ladybirds

Sure they’re pretty, but they’re useful too:  Look out for ladybirds with bright orange, yellow or red wings and black spots this summer. Picture: James Niland
Sprays Could Be Killing Our Ladybirds
Sure they’re pretty, but they’re useful too: Look out for ladybirds with bright orange, yellow or red wings and black spots this summer. Picture: James Niland

THIS summer, the Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife is warning residents to reduce the use of pesticides and harsh chemicals in their gardens.

Chief executive Susanna Bradshaw says these sprays could be killing nature’s best bug controller – the ladybird.

“Ladybirds will happily eat up many of the insects that attack garden plants,” she said.

“An adult ladybird will consume around 2500 bugs during its lifetime.

“We recommend being patient and waiting for the ladybirds to come to you; however you can purchase them to help establish a population.”

To attract ladybirds people can try planting nectar and pollen-producing native plants, watering early in the morning and mulching to retain heat and water.

To find out what ladybirds are in your area, visit the Atlas of Living Australia website.

To find out how to turn your back yard into a habitat haven, join the Australian Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife’s Backyard Buddies mailing list.