Maylands Lakes: City of Bayswater tackles algae issue in light of residents’ concerns

The City of Bayswater and Friends of Maylands Lakes have been working together on the remediation of the Maylands lakes. This photo was taken on June 26. Photo: Andrew Ritchie
The City of Bayswater and Friends of Maylands Lakes have been working together on the remediation of the Maylands lakes. This photo was taken on June 26. Photo: Andrew Ritchie

CONCERNS from Maylands residents over tonnes of green algae in the Maylands Lakes has led to the City of Bayswater taking action to remove it this week.

Algae is an aquatic plant which includes the seaweeds and many single-celled forms.

The City and Friends of Maylands Lakes (FOML) group have been working together on a $1.7 million management plan to restore Lake Brearley, Lake Bungana and the Brickworks lakes.

Maylands resident Mike Coffey said he reported to the City that algae had built up in Lake Brearley, where his house backed onto, along with Lake Bungana and the Brickworks lake.

“I spoke to the contractors on June 27 and they advised they had removed 1.5 tonnes of algae sludge from the lake area at the back of my house and they will continue,” he said.

“My main worry is that once they clear this particular algae sludge, will the contractors return when it forms again (because) it’s taken the City many weeks to get their act together in this instance.

“Also it should be noted that the current long-term algae removal work – dredging and floating islands, as been carried out by the City – probably won’t stop the algae sludge forming again in the short term.”

Mayor Dan Bull said the City was acting on residents’ concerns about the water quality of the lakes.

“Already this year, the City has installed two pollutant traps and 18 floating wetlands, carried out a Phoslock treatment and started work to revegetate the area,” he said.

“Grates have also been added to surrounding drains to prevent turtles from becoming trapped.

“All of these initiatives have been undertaken with the support of the proactive Friends of Maylands Lakes community group.

“In addition to these longer-term measures, the City has been working to remove debris from the lakes over the past few days … this should help to improve the appearance of the water.”

FOML chairman Geoff Trott said the deterioration of the lakes was slower during this year’s mild summer compared to recent summers.

“Nevertheless, their condition remains precarious and an unsightly green algae sludge continues to pervade in several areas of Lake Brearley, where nearby residents remain concerned at the foul stench, along with the potential hazard it poses,” he said.

“While the aforementioned works have had negligible impact to date, they have laid the foundation for phase two of the program, (to commence this calendar year) which is expected to yield a noticeable improvement in the health of the Lakes.”