Maylands’ The Castle to remain on City of Bayswater’s Heritage Inventory


Jade Lippiatt, who owns The Castle, wants the handsome 125-year-old house to remain on the City’s Heritage Inventory.
Picture: Will Russell        www.communitypix.com.au   d467601
Jade Lippiatt, who owns The Castle, wants the handsome 125-year-old house to remain on the City’s Heritage Inventory. Picture: Will Russell        www.communitypix.com.au d467601

THE Castle’s timber joinery and castellated front parapet wall hint at a different time in Maylands – and its owner swears the century-and-a-quarter house is not haunted.

When Jade Lippiatt and husband Andrew bought their Stuart Street home 10 years ago the facade of the house, which reflects the Albany Bell Castle style, was already on the City of Bayswater’s Municipal Heritage Inventory and they want it to stay there.

The City is currently reviewing its inventory – last reviewed in 2006 – and residents can nominate a building or a place they feel has historical or cultural significance.

Ms Lippiatt said construction started on The Castle in 1894 as part of the Ferguson Estate that grew in response to the Ferguson Foundry. According to oral history, it was once a maternity hospital.

A historical plaque on the front of the house appears to advertise ‘pianoforte’ lessons with a Cecil R. Donald, thought to have been a previous occupant.

“I don’t think it’s haunted,” she said with a smile.

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Ms Lippiatt said they were attracted to the heritage qualities of her house, particularly her husband who was part of a medieval re-enactment group.

“Maylands was once an outer suburb, now it’s an inner city fringe suburb and with all the development and infill, the preservation of heritage is important,” she said.

Mayor Barry McKenna said heritage buildings added character to the local area and provided the community with a sense of history, for example Tranby House and the patina of the Peninsula Hotel.

Maylands Ratepayers and Residents Association president Elli Petersen-Pik said the group would nominate several shops along Guildford Road as part of the review, thought to be built early 20th century.

“This review is a great opportunity to get those buildings – or at least, their facades – protected, especially in light of the current proposal to widen Guildford Road,” he said.

“We hope that the owners of those buildings will support the move and also see it as an opportunity.”

Owners of properties on the inventory can apply for heritage grants up to $4000 for maintenance works.