Plans to make Eighth Avenue in Maylands the ‘place to be’

Luke Dimasi (deputy chairman of the MBA) with chairman  Mike De Rutyer have plans to make Eighth Avenue in Maylands a buzzing hub of pedestrian-friendly activities. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au   d472356
Luke Dimasi (deputy chairman of the MBA) with chairman Mike De Rutyer have plans to make Eighth Avenue in Maylands a buzzing hub of pedestrian-friendly activities. Picture: Andrew Ritchie www.communitypix.com.au d472356

THE Maylands Business Association (MBA) is forming a “pedestrian friendly and leafy” plan for Eighth Avenue to make the town centre “a place to be”.

The plan, which started 12 months ago, would complement a future City of Bayswater report on the treatments to facilitate the implementation of a pedestrian-friendly shared place between Eighth Avenue and Whatley Crescent.

At last month’s committee meeting, Bayswater Council voted for Councillor Dan Bull’s motion for a report which could include a 30km/h zone, tree planting, streetscaping to improve shared space, use of surfaces to manage traffic and removal of curbs.

After the City’s report was brought back to committee, the project would be considered in a future budget review and included in the Corporate Business Plan.

MBA chair Michiel de Rutyer said the current speed limit of 40 km/h on Eighth Avenue was “too fast” despite the average speed on the street being 35km/h.

“We still have the occasional person who comes through at 45km/h and that is way too fast down here and yet they feel entitled to do so,” he said.

“There are people who charge through here and we would like to see it reduced to 30 km/h which basically says this is a pedestrian area, and not a car friendly area.

“The MBA would like to see a community space which benefits both the businesses in the street and the community in developing an area which has more greenery, seating and basically a place to be.”

Mr de Rutyer said he welcomed the City’s report and the MBA would continue working with the City to form a “mutually beneficial” solution.

“The foot traffic in Eighth Avenue has reduced a lot over the last 12 months in particular,” he said.

“Once we get a review done, we’ll then give that review to Council and then try and get Council to put some money in down the track.

“Detailed designs will have to be the next stage…once we have the detailed design, then it has to be budgeted for.”

According to an officer’s report, detailed landscape planning could cost $40,000.

The report said the ultimate implementation of a 30km/h zone was under the control of Main Roads WA and would require their approval.