Bayswater residents to have say on plant at SAT

Disgruntled residents in front of a retaining wall for the new concrete batching plant. In the foreground are Sally Palmer and Karen Ring. Picture: Marcus Whisson       www.communitypix.com.au   d438591
Disgruntled residents in front of a retaining wall for the new concrete batching plant. In the foreground are Sally Palmer and Karen Ring. Picture: Marcus Whisson       www.communitypix.com.au d438591

THE State Administration Tribunal (SAT) is allowing witness statements about the proposed concrete batching plant on Collier Road from City of Bayswater councillors at this month’s hearing.

The council and residents’ four-year battle against WA Limestone’s application on behalf of Ransberg will continue with the matter going to the SAT from December 15-17 after the applicant appealed Bayswater’s refusal of its amended proposal.

WA Limestone shares common directors and management with WA Premix which operates two batching plants in Bibra Lake and Mandurah.

Councillors rejected the original application in 2011 after strong opposition from residents with concerns of noise, heavy |vehicle traffic, proximity to homes and health risks from pollution.

Since then the matter has gone back and forth between the council and SAT, with amended plans submitted to the council.

Witness statements opposing the plant will be presented at the hearing from two residents, a local business owner, Councillor Sally Palmer and Mayor Barry McKenna.

Cr McKenna said the council’s main concerns were that the amended proposal did not provide sufficient information to demonstrate the satisfactory control of dust emissions, and that they would not unduly affect the surrounding residential area and Joan Rycroft Reserve.

Cr McKenna said the amended proposal was not consistent with Town Planning Scheme No. 24 to secure the amenity, health and convenience of the area and residents.

Cr Palmer, who has fought the proposal since its inception, said in her witness statement she would expand on the large extent of business and residential opposition to the noxious dangers imposed on the community of Bayswater and Bassendean.

“This residential area and park(s) existed long before the proposed concrete batching plant; therefore it is not a proper amenable structure to be placed within an area of people living, working, breathing and playing,” she said. “No sense can be made of this proposal at all.”