Seniors’ Budget fears grow

Opposition leader Bill Shorten meets seniors at the Bedford Bowling Club.
Opposition leader Bill Shorten meets seniors at the Bedford Bowling Club.

The Government announced earlier this year it would reform the age pension, increasing the eligibility age to 70 by July 1, 2035, and link indexation to consumer price index movements from September, 2017.

The rally, hosted by Federal Opposition leader Bill Shorten and Perth MHR Alannah MacTiernan, attracted self-funded retirees and pensioners.

Ms MacTiernan said the overwhelming view was that seniors were being treated as if they were a liability.

‘They are really pretty angry and hurt that the whole language that the Government has is that aged people are a problem and we have got to reduce the benefits that are going to the aged,’ she said.

‘Their view is that they were a group of people that had been the generation that has lived through war and they’ve been a generation that’s worked hard.

‘There weren’t big social security benefits or educational opportunities then and they feel this general practitioner tax, cuts to their pensioner concession and the change to the indexation to the pension is very unfair and not necessary.

‘There’s no doubt the poor and the aged are in fact targeted and bearing the brunt of this budget.’

The Federal Treasurer’s office did not respond to questions put by the Eastern Reporter.