WAM ‘disappointed’ City of Bayswater wouldn’t support 2017 Festival Live Event

WAM ‘disappointed’ City of Bayswater wouldn’t support 2017 Festival Live Event

WA Music (WAM) chief executive Mike Harris is “disappointed” with Bayswater Council refusing to fund $9000 for a 2017 Festival Live Event but felt “heartened” by council’s interest in hosting future events.

Councillors at the September 12 meeting voted to not support a proposed Sunday festival finale concert on November 5 and write to WAM explaining why it was rejected.

However, it said it would consider future opportunities to participate.

According to an officer’s report, there were no funds in the 2017-18 budget to cover $5000 for the concert and $4000 to provide a stage.

Venues that were considered included The Rise, Riverside Gardens, Houghton Park, Robert Thompson Reserve and Bardon Park.

Mr Harris said to his understanding, this was WAM’s first application for an event with the City of Bayswater.

“The City’s enthusiasm for future collaborations with a longer lead-in time is encouraging and we look forward to working with City of Bayswater for the WAMFest 2018,” he said.

“The Town of Bassendean will be a part of WAMFest this year and we are looking at least one other council for similar activity, which is not finalised as yet but close to being so.”

Mr Harris said he expected between 30,000 to 40,000 people to take part in activities in the metropolitan and regional areas during the festival.

Bayswater councillor Dan Bull |said it would be great to host a WAM festival which would give exposure to local bands, but he understood why City officers rejected the application because of the high cost.

“Hopefully, it (the letter) will help with future opportunities where there is funding,” he said.

Cr Sally Palmer said she wanted to see more concerts at the City’s parks.

The festival will run from October 27 to November 5.

MORE: VIDEO: Drone footage of whale and calf off Perth’s coast

MORE: Curtin University law students offer services to small businesses pro bono

MORE: New signs designed to create smooth sailing for surfers