Downsizing to an apartment not a downgrade from a family home

Aidan Power and son Jack enjoying the view from their Oracle apartment.
Aidan Power and son Jack enjoying the view from their Oracle apartment.

A MAYLANDS family has said it would consider downsizing to an apartment for the associated lifestyle benefits after a recent trial with the WA Apartment Advocacy.

Aidan Power and son Jack were one of 12 lucky entries that received a free test run in the Oracle Apartments on the corner of Stirling and Aberdeen streets in Perth as part of a unique social experiment.

Aidan said he had initial concerns about noise levels associated with multi-unit living and being in the CBD, but soon discovered they were unfounded.

“I was wondering how noisy it would be and that’s been proven not to be the case at all,” Aidan said. “You can’t actually hear anything.

“I play guitar on the balcony and nobody has complained and I was talking to the building manager and he plays saxophone on the 13th floor – so one floor below us – and I never hear him.”

While son Jack developed a healthy interest in the complex’s pool, Aidan said he found the extra time he had on hand and easy access to amenities particular refreshing.

“The closeness to work and getting in and out of work just frees up so much time; you gain an hour every day,” Aidan.

“I’m not rushing to do things, I’m more relaxed, and I’ve used the gym a bit here because I’ve got time for that.”

The family has also hosted a dinner party in the communal entertaining space on the Oracle Apartments rooftop, which ensured nobody was missing their townhouse’s backyard.

“That communal space is a good idea; we used that the most on weeknights,” Aidan said. “It’s good that you can also meet in that public space so people can just have a chat.”

Security was another top benefit, according to Aidan, who did not have any hesitation in leaving Jack alone.

“I’m pretty happy to go out and close the door behind me,” Aidan said. “I wouldn’t pop out in the evening at all in my own house; this feels more secure.

“After the dinner party, we (the adults) all went out for a while and the kids stayed here, so that was good.

“They even brought over their new puppy because we’ve noticed loads of people in the building have dogs – every second person we meet in the lift has a dog.”

At the end of the month-long experiment, both father and son said they would miss the apartment.

“I’ll miss the pool, the upstairs and the balcony – you can look out and see everything unlike at our house,” Jack said.

“Living in an apartment you can live in the city,” Aidan said.

“We don’t live far from the city but still I would prefer to be in this location.

“And living in a large apartment block, being up this high, everyone really appreciates the view.”

WAAA director Samantha Reece said the Power family had mirrored the feelings of the other families also involved in the trial.

Previously, Ellenbrook couple Michelle and Justin D’Costa and their five-year-old son Toby underwent the same experiment with similarly positive results.

“Everyone has enjoyed the fact that they can have more quality family time together because of reduced work travel times and also the buildings amenities such as the pool table and pool,” Ms Reece said.

“Both families have been at a point of change in their life stages – Michelle and Justin because Toby is no longer in the baby stage so they can be more mobile and for Aidan and Jack, the fact that Jack is now able to be more independent and as such Aidan can have some more free time while knowing Jack is still safe.

“While downsizing has typically been associated with Baby Boomers, it is quite evident that this terminology can now be applied to any age who are seeking a greater deal of flexibility and freedom.”

The next family to move into the Oracle apartments is Baby Boomer couple Debbie and Karl.

MORE: Spearwood man charged with assaulting 90-year-old woman

MORE: WA punter $10 million richer after OzLotto win

MORE: Ocean Reef Marina a step closer after signing of MOU