A sea of food on offer at Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour


Main picture: Artist Brenton See’s mural of a very large crustacean. Inset: Chef Sunny de Ocampo and fisherman Damien Bell. Pictures: Matt Jelonek        www.communitypix.com.au   d467488
A sea of food on offer at Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour
Main picture: Artist Brenton See’s mural of a very large crustacean. Inset: Chef Sunny de Ocampo and fisherman Damien Bell. Pictures: Matt Jelonek        www.communitypix.com.au d467488

WHEN there is an event celebrating the state’s sustainable seafood industry, there are not many more suitable locations to hold it than Fremantle’s Fishing Boat Harbour.

The WA Fishing Industry Council’s Sustainable Seafood Day was at the harbour on Friday, introducing passersby to all the best in sustainable seafood, including taste tests of Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified Shark Bay prawns, Mandurah sea mullet and Fremantle octopus.

The harbour even received an artistic reminder of its fishing-industry ties with a new mural from artist Brenton See.

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WAFIC chief executive John Harrison said WA had an excellent reputation for the sustainable management of its commercial fisheries.

“Since the MSC initiative was established in 2012, we have seen every single one of WA’s 50 plus fisheries go through MSC pre-assessment,” he said.

“This process establishes how sustainable they are, whether they need to improve the management of their respective fisheries and if they want to undertake to full MSC assessment program.

“Achieving MSC certification means they are officially recognised by a third-party independent assessment agency under world’s best standards as a fully sustainable fishery – which means indefinite fishing, minimal environmental impact and effective management.”