Civmec and Henderson ready for defence work


Civmec chairman Jim Fitzgerald takes Michael Mischin through the company’s workshop at the Australian Marine Complex in Henderson.
Civmec chairman Jim Fitzgerald takes Michael Mischin through the company’s workshop at the Australian Marine Complex in Henderson.

ENGINEERING and construction firm Civmec is in the perfect position to secure work outlined in the $90 billion worth of naval defence contracts announced by the Federal Government recently, Commerce Minister Michael Mischin says.

There was initial disappointment with WA being left with little of the $40 billion investment in the shipbuilding industry and French company DCNS winning a $50 billion contract in principle to build the next generation of Australian Navy submarines, with the majority of work heading to South Australia.

Touring Civmec last week, Mr Mischin said the Henderson-based company was well tuned to undertake work associated with the offshore patrol vessels, frigates and submarines, should opportunities flow out of Adelaide.

He said the same applied to other WA firms.

That message should be pushed further when a seminar with DCNS is held in Fremantle on May 24 to discuss technology transfer opportunities for local industry.

“In an era where modules can be built anywhere and transported to the assembly location, our internationally competitive industry will play a significant role,” he said.

It followed comments by Premier Colin Barnett quelling fears WA contractors would not benefit from the DCNS contract.

“Although the bulk of the submarine build will occur in Adelaide from 2025, the Future Submarine project is viewed by the Australian Government as a national endeavour and I would expect the proven capabilities of the state’s naval shipbuilding sector will be called upon,” he said.

Mr Barnett also announced a new long-term contract for the maintenance of the Anzac Class Frigates would be centred in WA.

The contract is valued at $2 billion for the first eight years.

Civmec’s general manager of defence Mike Deeks said the company was confident work would flow WA’s way.

“There’s an awful lot of work to be done and we’re expecting a certain amount to come to our state,” he said.