Food law needs reheating

Donna Perfect, of Spearwood, and Leanne Loveless, of Redcliffe, enjoy alfresco dining. Picture: Elle Borgward          d435265
Donna Perfect, of Spearwood, and Leanne Loveless, of Redcliffe, enjoy alfresco dining. Picture: Elle Borgward d435265

As the popularity of alfresco dining means more local eateries are offering the option of eating outside, the City says the introduction of the law would allow them to better regulate, control and manage alfresco dining in the area, while making sure diners, pedestrians and motorists stayed out of each other�s way.

Parliament disallowed the initial alfresco dining local law due to a number of �shortfalls�.

Fremantle field services manager Matthew Piggott said changes to the law included replacing the term �eating house� with �food business�, simplifying the fee structure and including more information on infringement notices and appeals.

�Alfresco dining continues to be extremely popular, not only in Fremantle but across the world,� he said.

�The City of Fremantle�s updated and modernised local law will continue to support local food businesses that wish to utilise the city�s land to provide alfresco dining space for customers.�

During the council meeting, councillor Rachel Pemberton asked what could be done to ensure future laws would not be knocked back by parliament.

Fremantle chief executive Graeme Mackenzie said rejection occurred on two grounds either because the proposal had errors or for policy reasons, and that sometimes a rejection would occur.