Fremantle pop up shop showcase Freo Alternative

David Broadway from L to R Landlord Joseph Geha, WAAA director Samantha Reece, Minister Peter Tinley, designer John Damant and Mayor of Fremantle Brad Pettitt.
David Broadway from L to R Landlord Joseph Geha, WAAA director Samantha Reece, Minister Peter Tinley, designer John Damant and Mayor of Fremantle Brad Pettitt.

FREMANTLE’S newest pop up store is a first for Western Australia.

The WA Apartment Advocacy (WAAA) opened an educational shop front on Sunday to endorse the Freo Alternative planning framework.

Last year the City of Fremantle voted to change their local planning scheme, which included six control areas throughout sections of White Gum Valley, Hilton, O’Connor, Beaconsfield and Fremantle, with provisions for small infill development as an alternative to single lot division.

Provisions include a maximum of three dwellings on lots of 750 square metres or less, a minimum of 70 per cent open space and at least one large tree to be planted or retained for each dwelling.

WAAA director Samantha Reece said with the adoption of the plan they became aware of people not understanding the principles of the reform.

“When I met John Damant about 3-4 months ago and saw the hard work he had invested over the last 3-4 years to actually create a design for every block identified in the Freo Alternative framework, I knew that I needed to provide a platform to demonstrate this new design that allowed for so many benefits including tree canopy,” she said.

“I am hoping that since people can just walk into the shop and have a discussion with John about the Freo Alternative and his Econest designs that there will be a groundswell of acceptance and that these people in turn will become advocates for housing choice.”

Housing Minister Peter Tinley said although there have been huge improvements, Perth’s fringes continue to grow in contrast to existing suburbs.

“It is crucially important that we take a creative approach to championing good quality infill development,” he said.

“WAAA’s ‘missing middle’ pop-up shop is a great example of how we can think outside the box and work towards improving the liveability and connectedness of our suburbs.”

The store will be open for two months.