Fremantle: Poppies lightshow at Maritime Museum

Lindsay Lovering (pres Fremantle RSL) and Les Butt (Chief Commemorative Warden Fremantle RSL) at the WA Maritime Museum.
Lindsay Lovering (pres Fremantle RSL) and Les Butt (Chief Commemorative Warden Fremantle RSL) at the WA Maritime Museum.

THE poppy, a symbol for the dead and the living, will be part of an animated lightshow for the 100 year armistice memorial services.

On November 10 the WA Maritime Museum will feature the lightshow, which will include 59,000 red poppies.

Fremantle RSL president Lindsay Lovering said she thought the lightshow was a fantastic idea.

“It is a great way to engage with the community in this way because it’s such an important part of ANZAC and First World War traditions,” he said.

“To combine technology and art to communicate those traditions to a wide cross section of the community is highly commendable.”

The veteran said the poppy was an important symbol.

“The poppy was something that flourished during the war,” he said.

“It was a great testament to nature that it was such a sturdy symbol of survival.”

Fremantle RSL chief commemorative warden Les Butt said the poppy was a symbol for those who lost their lives on both sides.

“It’s very important when they see a poppy that 60,000 odd Australians were killed and New Zealanders lost 30,000 soldiers,” he said.

“With the population of New Zealand was barely 900,000 and Australia barely four million, the cream of the youth was basically gone.”

Veterans Issues minister Peter Tinley said the impact of World War I on Australia, the way of life and its identity as a nation cannot be overstated.

“The personal stories of those impacted by the war are incredibly moving and I am honoured to be part of the Centenary of Armistice commemorations,” he said.

“The cascading poppies light show will be a spectacular way to honour our servicemen and women a century after their sacrifice and service.”