Fremantle: St Pat’s outreach workers to receive new training to tackle drug overdoses

Sean Gallacher, outreach worker with St. Pat’s Crossroads program holding the Memorial Book signed by people who have lost friends or relatives to overdose.
Sean Gallacher, outreach worker with St. Pat’s Crossroads program holding the Memorial Book signed by people who have lost friends or relatives to overdose.

DRUG overdoses do not discriminate, it could be someone’s daughter, son, father, mother or best friend.

Because of this, St Patricks Community Centre in Fremantle raised awareness for drug overdoses as part of the international awareness day recently .

Crossroads Assertive AOD Outreach Worker Sean Gallacher said the day was a global event.

“It aims to raise awareness of overdose and reduce the stigma of a drug-related death,” he said.

“It also acknowledges the grief felt by families and friends remembering those who have died or had a permanent injury as a result of drug overdose.”

He said St Pat’s were providing him free Naloxone training.

“It is what ambulance officers give someone if they have overdosed on an opioid-Naloxone only works on opioids, such as heroin, morphine, methadone, oxycodone and fentanyl,” he said.

“It has no side effects on anyone who has not used opioids.

“The training will cover how to recognise and respond to opioid overdose, included in the training will be legally prescribed Naloxone kit.

“Anyone can attend the training, including family members, friends and other people who may witness opioid overdose.”

Mr Gallacher, who has worked in the alcohol and drug sector for five years, said that overdose could affect anyone and was preventable.

“There is a lot of stigma around overdose and although homeless people are at risk of overdose the largest increase in accidental overdose deaths are with people who take prescribed drugs,” he said.

“I’ve become increasingly aware of the dangers of opioid overdose and the increase in the number of fatal or life changing overdoses.”