It takes a community to bust crime – police

Portrait of bride and groom by church
Portrait of bride and groom by church

Former South Metropolitan District Office Superintendent John Lindley said police hoped residents would take a pro-active approach by reporting all behaviour that is detrimental to their community.

‘We would ask that you report the incidents regardless of whether the police are able to take action or not,’ he said in December.

‘It’s better we know about hot spots and be able to plan to do something about them than not know and do nothing.

‘It’s the help us help you approach.’

Current Superintendent Brad Sorrell said he was keen to reinforce that community message.

‘We’d definitely reinforce that notion on the basis that even if there’s a delay in the response, even the most minor jobs can be recorded for investigation,’ he said.

‘When we gather all that information it becomes vital intelligence for us to use.

‘We’re really looking to take it up to (hoons and criminals).

‘Tyre marks on the road or graffiti on homes and buildings are two things that really disappoint people.’

An Atwell woman, who chose not to release her names, said anti-social behaviour was on the rise.

The woman said she has had cars race down her street, eggs thrown at her house, items stolen from her car and last Saturday night someone shot a spud gun at the window of her partner’s car.

‘I’ve lived in the area for 10 years and I always used to feel safe because I never had any trouble,’ the woman said.

‘But it has been getting worse and when people are causing damage to your car and stealing things, it’s not good.

‘We have thought about getting cameras but I don’t think that would deter them.’

Cockburn Mayor Logan Howlett said the City’s CoSafe security service, Neighbourhood Watch and its close relationship with police are measures taken to keep anti-social behaviour under control.