Location courts controversy

The proposal went before the strategic and general services committee last week, which saw the City endorse two potential locations and had 52 per cent of respondents support a basketball court in the area.

But when members of Hoop Hopes, the basketball group pushing for the court, put forward their preferred third location option, councillors voiced their concerns over springing a different option on to the community.

Cr Rachel Pemberton said that having been through the Youth Plaza issues, for the City to agree to the Hoop Hopes option that was not part of the initial conversation could present a problem.

But Cr Andrew Sullivan said any change to that environment would see parties who did not agree with it.

Infrastructure and project delivery acting director Lionel Nicholson said holding a community workshop to further discuss potential locations with the community was the best way forward.

�All of these locations have pros and cons and a workshop will allow everyone to tease out the positives and shortcomings for each and work towards resolving any concerns,� he said.

Mr Nicholson said the workshop would only go ahead if it were allocated funds in the upcoming City budget.

Hoop Hopes member Toby Lyhne said it would be a community area, not just a slab of concrete for basketballers.

�We hope the surrounding community will buzz over a place by the coast where people can come together and unite over a common flow,� he said.

�I guess a percentage are fearful the concrete will destroy the grassed area, but really, when people are connecting, there�s nothing but life.

�It also opens a window to hold Streetball competitions, enough room for a theatre production to play out their imaginations, a band to share their tunes, and where ultimately other sports like futsal and roller hockey can take place.�