Rubbish security needs improvement

Cockburn councillors Stephen Pratt and Phil Eva survey the mess.
Cockburn councillors Stephen Pratt and Phil Eva survey the mess.

Among the random items scattered across the open space, located on Moyland Road, are fridges, tyres, cement bags, car parts, a drum kit, computers, microwaves and kids toys.

Most dangerous however are the countless sheets of asbestos fencing currently exposed to the elements and rotting under recent rain.

Disappointingly, the dumping is happening less than a kilometre from the Henderson Waste Recovery Park, a facility that accepts asbestos sheeting bound in black plastic and a facility Cockburn ratepayers enjoy six free trailer passes to each year.

In a move made by the State Government last year to stop this very thing, properly wrapped asbestos was made exempt from the landfill levy.

Despite this, some continue to choose the illegal option.

Central ward councillor Philip Eva said the lot was being turned into the ‘second rubbish tip in Cockburn’.

‘Something needs to be done, firstly to get it cleaned up and secondly to ensure that people aren’t able to access the area,’ he said.

‘I heard reports of dumping, but it was worse than I anticipated. It’s terrible.

Fellow central ward councillor Stephen Pratt said the field was a safety hazard.

‘If this was on private property action would be taken against you,’ he said.

John Hackett, general manager of LandCorp’s economic and employment program, said the agency had implemented several measures, including surveillance, gates and boulders, over the last few years to stop dumping on site.

‘Gates previously installed to restrict access to the site have been damaged and are in the process of being repaired,’ he said

‘Stronger security measures are being investigated to further restrict access.

‘It is expected removal of the rubbish will commence once a suitable solution is agreed (between LandCorp, the Department of Environment Regulation and the City).’