State budget: Fremantle eyes funding for projects

State budget: Fremantle eyes funding for projects

AS the new State Government’s first budget looms, Fremantle’s two councils have earmarked a number of local projects that they want to see funded.

In the Freo2029 Transformational Moves strategy, the City of Fremantle outlined the redevelopment of the South Quay and Fremantle Oval precincts as their two key priority projects for the year and the two that most needed State Government support.

“We believe a redeveloped South Quay has the potential to attract private investment of up to $3.5 billion and provide more than 3700 new jobs as well as creating a much improved entry statement for cruise ship passengers, but ultimately the State Government is responsible for that area,” Fremantle mayor Brad Pettitt said.

“The return of Fremantle Oval to community hands represents a great opportunity to turn it into a fantastic community asset but the benefits can only be fully realised if the government moves to unlock state-owned land in the area.

“We have identified these two projects as they represent the best opportunities to stimulate growth, create jobs, develop under-utilised assets and maximise the social and economic benefit to the state, but they can’t proceed without state government support.”

Dr Pettitt said there were also some short term and long term projects that needed funding.

“In the short term we’d like to see the State Government commit to the creation of a new pedestrian-friendly forecourt outside the Fremantle train station that better connects the city centre with Fremantle Harbour,” he said.

“Longer term we’d also like a commitment towards the planning for the progressive relocation of non-tourism port activities from the southern side of Victoria Quay to pave the way for the redevelopment of that area.”

The budget will be handed down on September 7.

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