Tie-down headache


Strapped for solutions: Education officer Emma Baker and community engagement and communications officer Taryn Davis.  Picture: Jon Hewson         www.communitypix.com.au   d449340
Strapped for solutions: Education officer Emma Baker and community engagement and communications officer Taryn Davis. Picture: Jon Hewson        www.communitypix.com.au d449340

The straps, which can be purchased at most hardware stores, have been an issue for the past 12 months because they become tangled in machinery at the SMRC’s recycling facility.

People mistakenly think they can be recycled and pop them in their yellow-topped bin.

Chief executive Tim Youe said the plant was forced to shut down 10 times a week while the machinery was cleared.

“The whole plant has to be stopped and the jam cleared before any more waste can be processed,” he said.

It takes at least 12 minutes to clear a jam as the plant needs to run down, the blockage is cleared, and then the plant is re-started.

The delays cost the organisation $150,000 per year, but Mr Youe said the straps were also dangerous for staff.

“Long pieces of strapping with metal ends that flick around could potentially come into contact with a staff member, causing them serious injury,” he said.

The straps cannot be put into green-topped bins either because they cause problems at the SMRC’s compost facility.

The best way to get rid of them is through verge-side collections or by taking them to a transfer station.

For information, visit the Recycle Right website www.recycleright.wa.gov. au, or download the app.