World Continence Week: support for women with incontinence


Nadia Norrish, of Totum Physiotherapy and Pilates for Women, with Meaghan and Keira Barnaby.
Nadia Norrish, of Totum Physiotherapy and Pilates for Women, with Meaghan and Keira Barnaby.

IT is one of the least reported health issues Australians experience, but the Continence Foundation of Australia (CFA) says bladder leakage should not be ignored.

According to a national health survey of 1000 women aged 30 or older, 80 per cent of those with incontinence issues did not see a doctor, a statistic Continence Foundation of Australia WA’s Sally Gilchrist said was too high for a treatable condition.

“Many people mistakenly believe incontinence is a natural part of ageing or having a child, but it isn’t,” she said.

“Incontinence won’t improve left untreated and can get worse, but the good news is most cases can be prevented, cured or better managed with some simple lifestyle practices and pelvic floor exercises.”

Continence Foundation of Australia chief executive Rowan Cockerell said awareness was growing, with a World Continence Week event in Fremantle on Thursday completely sold out, but people needed to stop feeling embarrassed about a loss of bladder control.

World Continence Week runs until June 25.

Visit www.continence.org.au for more.

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