Hilltop Hoods bridge the generation gap

Hilltop Hoods on Saturday night. All photos: Andrew Ritchie
Hilltop Hoods on Saturday night. All photos: Andrew Ritchie

THE Hilltop Hoods are showing some serious street cred and longevity in the Australian music industry.

An entire generation who grew up with the three-piece hip hop outfit are now milling about in the crowd with youngsters not even conceived when the boys from Adelaide released their debut album A Matter of Time in 1999.

And they’re even bringing their own children to the shows.

Photo: Andrew Ritchie.

So it’s apt that their latest album The Great Expanse is about longevity and bridging generational divides.

The Hilltop Hoods’ Suffa (Matt Lambert), Pressure (Daniel Smith) and DJ Debris (Barry Francis) have sold out arenas across the nation and the crowd at the Perth Arena joined the party on Saturday night.

Foreplay for the evening came courtesy of High Wycombe rapper Shadow, DJ Nino Brown and Mojo Juju whose powerful vocal set seduced the building crowd ahead of the main ticket.

Mojo Juju. Photo: Andrew Ritchie

Perth was the last leg of the Hoodies’ Australian tour and there were no signs of fatigue as Suffa and Pressure criss-crossed the stage in a bouncing set that delved into the old and new.

As lights circled the Arena and the smoke machines let rip the trio hit the stage with the energetic opener Chase That Feeling from 2009.

Confetti and streamers rained down as they performed their new hit Leave Me Lonely and then the arms got pumping as the chorus and back beat from Melanie Safka’s People In The Front Row rang out and the Hoodies rewound back to their 2003 radio hit The Nosebleed Section.

Photo: Andrew Ritchie

 

Nyassa joined the stage for 1955, striking in her outfit that screamed Judy Jetson on her wedding day. At times her voice was drowned out but she shone later in Sell It All, Run Away.

Illy and Ecca Vandal were on hand to perform Exit Sign followed by Be Yourself and Counterweight.

Clark Griswold, a tongue-in-cheek tribute to the pleasures and pitfalls of fatherhood is a musical reminder there’s an entire generation who grew up with the band.

To avoid getting hate mail from the fans who have been with the Hoodies since the beginning, the group delved into the back catalogue with Live and Let Go, Higher, The Hard Road, Still Standing and Rattling the Keys to the Kingdom.

The night closed with Cosby Sweater, the Hilltop Hoods’ highest charting single to date. The catchy song, which references the gaudy knits favoured by Bill Cosby, is one regret for the group. With the sexual assault allegations involving Cosby the group have publicly stated they regret name checking the disgraced 80s comedian.

Overall the Hoodies delivered a dynamite, non-stop set that didn’t skip a beat. And they showed young and old they have kept their Hilltop sound without sounding like they are on repeat.

4.5/5