Trinity student wins 2014 Australian Gemini Astronomy Contest

Professor Richard McDermid with Trinity College Year 11 student Samuel Carbone.
Professor Richard McDermid with Trinity College Year 11 student Samuel Carbone.

SAMUEL Carbone says it was a surreal feeling to have an object he chose in the sky photographed by two of the world’s largest optical telescopes.

The Year 11 Trinity College student won the 2014 Australian Gemini Astronomy Contest after he nominated an object in the Southern sky for the Gemini Observatory to image.

“For one of the leading observatories to take a photo of an object chosen by a high school student is a huge honour,” Samuel said.

The Gemini Observatory consists of a pair of telescopes – one on top of Cerro Pachon in the Andes Mountains of Chile and the other on Mauna Kea in Hawaii.

Australian Astronomy Observatory and Macquarie University Professor Richard McDermid visited Trinity College on September 9 to speak with astronomy students and present Samuel with his award in the astronomy contest.

Samuel received a professionally processed image of the object Interacting Galaxy “NGC 7727” after writing a winning explanation of why it would be interesting to photograph.

A panel of astronomers, educators and science journalists chose the winning entry.

Trinity College is the only school in the Southern Hemisphere to have its own Robotic Telescope.